Thursday, August 29, 2013

Tunnel Vision

This summer I went to Powell Gardens for their butterfly festival.
I didn't get a single cool pic.
It was crowded. I saw a beautiful one, with it's wings spread and all it's colors showing.
I  crept closer for that perfect shot when this young child came running over and grabbed it!
I've noticed that sometimes I get tunnel vision while taking pictures. If I go to take pics of butterflies, I only look for butterflies. I sometimes fail to "see" around me...leaving the interesting or the beautiful.
Disgusted about the failed butterfly photo shoot, I headed home, but by chance, I spotted this ole truck, with an ugly produce sign in the bed. Sometimes I'm so disgusted with a failed shoot that I don't stop and sometimes, I don't even see new or different opportunities.
anyway...Last year I took my granddaughter to RMNP in Colorado.  We took a simple hike around Bear Lake. I knew exactly what kind of pics I wanted. When we got back to the cabin, we compared photos. WoW!!! Hers were wonderful...I kept asking her, where did you get that photo???
She responded, Bear Lake. Sure made me wonder...where was I????
I vowed to broaden my view...to truly try to "see".
I have been amazed and shocked by some of the things I have learned about myself while looking through the viewfinder of a camera.
ommmm

17 comments:

Manzanita said...

Yup, tunnel vision happens. You entered my thoughts last night and I was thinking I hadn't seen you for a while. So today I see you. That is a neat old truck. You got it's best features.

Debra She Who Seeks said...

Interesting! Sounds like pre-planning and expectations don't necessarily work in photography, eh? It can be that way in life too, alas.

ellen abbott said...

I love the last shot of the broken window. Any good shots I get are totally serendipitous. I tried earlier today to get a shot of a big butterfly/moth? that was resting on the screen but as I shifted to get a better angle, it flew away.

turquoisemoon said...

Manzanita, Yep! I took a break from blogging. Needed it... I was spending too much time on it. I'm going to change some of my puter habits.

Debra...Ooh I think they work for good photographers. I'm still just learning. They warned us about this in one of the photography classes I took.

Ellen, That one was my favorite too. "Live" subjects are the hardest, I think anyway...

Arkansas Patti said...

Good to see you back. Was getting worried that your break was addictive.
Too bad about the butterfly. I sure hope the child didn't kill it.
I am like that too much. When I have my camera, I also get tunnel vision and see only a prospective shot and not all that is around it.
Now days, when going somewhere special, I leave the camera at home and open my eyes.

turquoisemoon said...

Patti, No, she didn't kill it, but she sure ruined my photo. I guess I should be nicer...ugh!, but I'm not!!! I never leave my camera at home. I agree about open eyes, but never leave my camera at home. I think some should leave their phones at home...

Plowing Through Life (Martha) said...

I know exactly what you're talking about. Sometimes we miss the forest for the trees when we focus on a single subject. I find that my best photos always happen when I relax and look around casually without a plan. Eventually something catches my eye.

Out on the prairie said...

a nice image to have found

turquoisemoon said...

Martha, Ooh you are so right!!! I was only thinking about butterflies when I went there...It was like I was on a mission. silly me...

Steve, Thanks!!! The window was fun. I almost didn't go back to get this pic.

One Fly said...

Getting shut out - the way it is sometimes.

turquoisemoon said...

Fly, It just amazes me sometimes. And, when I don't see a thing to shoot blows my mind. Then...add just awful photography to the mix and I wonder...what in the heck am I doing???

Angelina said...

The trick is to not really try to SEE, then it will materialize. Just a thought.

turquoisemoon said...

Angelina...you are probably right!!! I sometimes try too hard.

FOLKWAYS NOTEBOOK said...

Here is a quote by Dorthea Lange that I keep on my work table.

"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.

As you know she was a famous depression era photographer.

Good post.

`` barbara

turquoisemoon said...

Barbara...No, I did not know her name, but I have seen her work. Now, I know her name, have printed off several of her quotes and read some about her. I will be getting to know more about this woman. Thank you for the introduction.

Cathy Sherman said...

That's a great lesson, Lynn! Sometimes, I'm so determined to get a certain shot that I don't see anything else. Your truck window photo is fabulous.

I went to the Powell Garden butterfly show a few years ago, but it was so crowded that I didn't really like any of my shots. There was a more expensive "photographer" viewing that year (maybe every year?), but I didn't go to it. Now I know why they offer it.

In August this year, I went to a butterfly garden at the Boston Science Museum. It was crowded, too, but there were timed entries, so it wasn't as crowded as at Powell Gardens. I was determined to get a Blue Morpho with wings open, and I did, but it wasn't as great as I'd hoped. That's about all I had to show for my efforts, a half-good photo of a Blue Morpho.

When I compared my photos with my son-in-law's, he had taken photos of a variety of interesting insects (such as hissing cockroach) he'd seen on the way out of the garden in the outer room. He and my daughter had left the butterfly garden long before I did, so I thought they weren't seeing as much as me! I didn't even see those insects and felt that I'd missed a lot, because I wasn't as open to the experience as I should have been. I had narrowed my focus, literally.
catherinesherman.wordpress.com

turquoisemoon said...

Ooh Cathy, I know! I saw that they had the "photographer" viewing this year...became a tight wad and didn't do it. Sometimes I wonder what's wrong with me...??? Barbara (Folkway's Notebook)introduced me to a quote by Dorthea Lange (see above) I love this and now it's my mantra.
"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."